“A Gentleman in Moscow” by Amor Towles

gentlemaninmoscowIt is rare to find an individual who has not secretly dreamed of checking themselves into a hotel for an extended period of time with no plans whatsoever. A Gentleman in Moscow allows readers to live this fantasy. It’s June of 1922 when we first meet Count Alexander Ilyich Rostov, recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt. As a gentleman, Count spends his days dining, discussing, reading, and reflecting. Unfortunately, he has also written a poem considered by many to be a “call to action” and, as a result, is sentenced to life on house arrest in the Metropol, a luxury hotel and home to the Boyarsky, the finest restaurant in Moscow.

The author, Amor Towles, was in the investment business for twenty years before he published his first novel, Rules of Civility. He frequently traveled for work and once, while in a hotel in Geneva, recognized the other guests from his stay the previous year. It was as if they had never left and that image gave him the idea for this book. Brainstorming for the novel actually began on complementary hotel stationery, which is particularly fitting.

If you are into travel, fine dining, reading, or other erudite hobbies, the book is absolutely atmospheric. Readers follow the Russian aristocrat around the grand hotel as he furnishes his new abode, dines on a breakfast of two biscuits and a fig, and befriends hotel guests while exploring the secrets contained within the hotel’s walls. The company one keeps and the value of those who cross our path in life are interesting ideas to contemplate as readers imagine their reaction should a similar fate come about.

The Metropol is an extension of city life and we see how it’s transformed by the world around it through the over thirty years we spend within its walls. When the Bolsheviks prohibited the use of rubles, it denied 99 percent of the population access to fine dining and yet we sit with Count as he enjoys a glass of wine and an entree of chicken saltimbocca. 

“If one did not master one’s circumstances, one was bound to be mastered by them.” and so it goes that Count makes the most of his situation by securing fine linens and a suitable pillow, four bars of his favorite soap, and a mille-feuille. His priorities are clearly quite well established and while house arrest is typically not something to celebrate, the count’s jovial mannerisms and thoughts create a lovely tone, quite suitable for smart summer reading at your favorite summer getaway.

Review by Karen Evans – New to the Book Nook, Karen is a local book blogger (https://booksnooks.wordpress.com/) and professional reader and reviewer with NetGalley. Watch Book Club member Marsha Redd and book buyer Andrew Kuharewicz on WZZM Channel 13’s “My West Michigan” morning show at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, June 3. Join The Book Nook’s monthly book club at 6:00 p.m., Wednesday, June 5 to discuss A Gentleman in Moscow at the Book Nook & Java Shop in Downtown Montague with refreshments, snacks, beverages, and camaraderie; of course, everyone is welcome. The Club meets monthly all year long. Get 20% off the Book Club’s book selection all month, too.

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“Beyond Words” by Carl Safina

Review by Andrew Kuharevicz

Beyond Words (nonfiction) is about those ideas and thought processes that take place without speech,

beyondwords

i.e. without words. This is the notion of “mind reading” in cognitive science, and it is applied to the animal world. We’re not talking about psychic abilities and science fiction, but rather, how we can tell how another person is feeling without talking to them. This is often called empathy, and in the science world it is called mind reading. Now, the author isn’t saying that animals have a human mind, instead arguing that we should try to understand the animal as its own being, such as the elephant mind, the wolf mind & the dolphin mind, and when we look at an animal, we should first ask the question “who are you?” If we do that, we can truly get into the mind of another creature separated from abstractions of our own human words, and after we do that, an objective scientific study can begin.

The author Carl Safina spent decades of research observing animals in the wild. In the opening pages he says the book is for those who truly listen to those we share this planet with, the animals that all too often get placed in the back of our human minds, secondary to what is important to us.

As you read you’ll discover that animals aren’t so different. Elephants for example, have been found to save humans when in danger, and on occasion even bury their own dead. Something we believe only humans are capable of doing. This book shows that what we think is so special about us, is shared with many social animals, making them not more like us, but the same as us.

Beyond Words is a beautifully written book that could be placed in an academic curriculum just as easily as it could be read by the mainstream book buyer. It’s one of those books that could prove to be eye opening to readers who don’t think of elephants as having the same type of individuality as humanity. The hope of this book (I believe) is to change our relationship with the animal world, giving more respect to the habitats we as humans brush aside in favor of our concerns and desires. This book shows that animals are the same when it comes to so many of the aspects we hold close to our hearts, and to what we believe separates us from them, another thing the author says we must realize is nothing but a socially created fabrication of truth. There is no us and them, we’re the same, and all animals, of the human and non-human variety, have evolved to love, show empathy, and without words, understand how other animals feel. The essence of consciousness goes beyond words. It’s not that humans aren’t special, we are, but animals are just as special as us. They have families, they dream and love and protect their children, and just because they don’t have armies and shopping malls doesn’t mean they don’t get afraid when they are hunted.

My only complaint is that the book is a bit too wordy, and the author seems to be saying the same thing over and over. Although sections differentiate by type of animals, such as elephants, wolves & whales, you keep reading the same conclusion, namely, that animals are conscious. But this is a science book, and science is about evidence, and that’s what Beyond Words is: it is a mountain of indisputable evidence proving that animals have a mind, something humans have, and something that goes far … beyond words.

Watch Bryan on WZZM Channel 13’s “My West Michigan” morning show at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, April 1.  Join The Book Nook’s monthly book club at 6:00 p.m., Wednesday, April 3 to discuss Beyond Words at the Book Nook & Java Shop in Downtown Montague with refreshments, snacks, beverages, and camaraderie; of course, everyone is welcome. The Club meets monthly all year long.  Get 20% off the Book Club’s book selection all month, too.

 

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“Five-Carat Soul” by James McBride

fivecaratsoul

Fiction writers create worlds with words – time, setting, mood, characters, meaning – hopefully delivered with an emotional impression.   James McBride proved himself a deft creator of worlds with the National Book Award-winning novel The Good Lord Bird.  The challenge with short stories is creating multiple meaningful worlds in just a few pages each.  With Five-Carat Soul, James McBride proved he was up to the task.

Five-Carat Soul consists of seven short stories, all humorous and poignant, touching on themes of race, freedom, and soul.

In the first, “The Under Graham Railroad Box Car Set,” a Jewish toy collector, Leo

Banskoff, follows a lead on a one-of-a kind model train built by Smith & Wesson and commissioned by Robert E. Lee just before the Civil War as a gift for his son Graham. When placing a value on a toy, it’s not just the item, but the story behind it.  “The sadder the story, the more valuable the toy. That is a human element, and it’s one that no painting has. The specific history of sorrow or joy in a child’s life, when determining the price, means the sky’s the limit.”  Leo finds the train’s owners in Queens, New York, a Rev. and Mrs. Hart. They are black and of meager means.  Leo is prepared to drive a hard bargain, starting with a low-ball offer of $90,000.  He is shocked when Mrs. Hart refuses the money and wants to give the train to Leo for free, because she and her husband are devoutly religious and uninterested in material things.  He tries to explain to her that the train is worth a lot of money, but she is not interested. “In this house, we care about souls, sir,” she admonishes. When Leo asks where he can find Rev. Hart, Mrs. Hart 

provides a list of his pious undertakings, including praying with prisoners at Riker’s Island, ministering at a church in Brooklyn, and conducting prayer meetings and Bible study.

Leo works out a deal to set up a trust fund for the Hart’s son.  He is left dissatisfied, however, because the Harts are reluctant to tell Leo how the train came into their possession. He wants the train’s story. Once he has almost given up, Leo tracks Rev. Hart to a hip-hop club in Brooklyn. Inside, Leo hears Rev. Hart perform a rap about the evils of slavery and the punishment God continues to mete out upon mankind for these evils. “…[A]n innocent child paying for generations of stolen trains, stolen cars, stolen land, stolen horses, stolen history, stolen people arriving at a strange land inside a merchant

ship…and then God’s punishment for their captors, passed down for generations to their captors’ innocent children…both captor and slave, suffering God’s justice and inexplicable will….”  Leo walks away from the performance feeling redeemed.

Two of the stories (“Father Abe” and “Fish Man Angel”) take place in the civil-war era.   “Father Abe” features a Colored Infantry Regiment. For nearly two years, the Civil War was a whites-only affair until the Emancipation Proclamation permitted the enlistment of African-American men.  Although fighting side-by-side, Father Abe says history will remember whites differently than blacks: “The white folks’ll know theirs, won’t they? They’ll write songs for ’em and raise flags for ’em, and put ’em in books…ain’t nobody but God gonna give more than a handful of feed to the ones of us who died out here fighting for our freedom.”

In all of McBride’s stories, big questions are posed and boldly addressed, building worlds of amazing variety.

Watch Bryan on WZZM Channel 13’s “My West Michigan” morning show at 9:00 a.m. on Mo

nday, March 4.  Join The Book Nook’s monthly book club at 6:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 6 to discuss Five-Carat Soul at the Book Nook & Java Shop in Downtown Montague with refreshments, snacks, beverages, and camaraderie; of course, everyone is welcome. The Club meets monthly all year long.  Get 20% off the Book Club’s book selection all month, too.

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“Against the Country” by Ben Metcalf

againstthecountryReview by Andrew H. Kuharevicz

“Here, then, is what I learned on, or because of, the American schoolbus:”

Above is an opening line to an early chapter in the “novel”, Against The Country, by Ben Metcalf (country being rural surrounded by small town). It’s a difficult, award winning book (Ten best books of the year, Vulture, Best book of the year, 2015, NPR), written by an author who’s been compared to literary legends such as David Foster Wallace (Infinite Jest) & William Falkner (The Sound & The Fury), and I placed the word Novel in quotations, because it stretches and almost subverts the idea of what a proper novel is. This isn’t ordinary fiction, nor is it escapism; Against The Country is literature, a book some will love and more will dislike, for its never-ending sentences and southern dialect heard throughout, a voice, that gets stuck in your head.

When I first picked up the book (randomly based on the green cover with nice large font) I hadn’t heard of Ben Metcalf. I suppose that was part of the problem, and I say that because you almost need to know who the author is, and how he was a literary editor at Harper’s Magazine, born in Illinois/raised in Virginia. Later on, Metcalf taught at Columbia University. Ben’s an author who knows what he’s doing, and what he wants to pull off with his book. So, it doesn’t hurt being versed in the styles that the author uses in telling his story, such as Falknerian (long sentences with emotional, cerebral, and Gothic elements). Against The Country is a dense work of art, a first person narrative lacking a straight forward plot, and is it good or bad? Well, like the novel itself, that’s a complicated question. It is one of those books (think any Henry Miller Novel) that when you accept you’ll never figure it out, and stop trying to classify what box it fits into, you’ll discover what a truly rich and beautiful book it is. Sure, it’s a hard undertaking to let go of our preconceptions, and of the eccentric nature of the Unknown Narrator. But you can turn to any page and find nuggets of truth, wisdom, and brilliant sociological observations, written in some of the most twang worthy and sweeping prose since Mark Twain. The book isn’t for everyone, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad book.

Against The Country is about The Town, its “potato-fed bullies with guns”, and about the false claim that the rural country is the heart of The United States. It’s a coming of age narrative that stumbles as much as the unconventional plot does. Readers-be-warned: You must give it an ample amount of time to sink in. It’s one of those books you have to re-read. But once you do, you’ll discover something perhaps even better than a “plot”. You’ll find a story about America. A story told by a character who like Holden Caulfield, will be a part of you even after the last page.

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“Asymmetry” by Lisa Halliday

asymmetryListed as one of New York Times top 10 books of 2018, Asymmetry is a literary phenomenon that satisfies on multiple levels.  On the basic level, the novel offers two engaging, purposely unrelated stories, exquisitely written.  At the next higher level, there are delicately subtle “blink-and-you-will-miss-it” threads that tie the sections together. Still higher, the novel explores asymmetry and inequities in age, power, talent, wealth, fame, geography and justice.  And at the meta level, the novel questions the writing of fiction itself.

The first section of the novel, “Folly,” begins with a meeting in a New York City park between Alice, a 25-year-old editorial assistant, and Ezra Blazer, a famous and critically acclaimed novelist in his seventies. Ezra asks Alice, “Are you game?”  The two swiftly begin an unconventional, tender romantic relationship whose duration spans the section. Ezra gives her books to read, among other odd gifts, and they watch baseball together and talk about literature. He teaches her how to pronounce Camus (“It’s Ca-MOO, sweetheart. He’s French.”). One day, on a walk, Alice confesses to him that she was doing some writing of her own. When he asks whether she writes about their relationship, she said she does not, and that she would rather write about people “more interesting” than her.

As their relationship grows closer, Alice begins to wonder about how it fits into the course and direction of her life. Ezra is in declining health, in need of regular medical attention, and frequently physically dependent on Alice. When she tells him that she does not think she can continue their relationship, Ezra says, “Don’t leave me. Don’t go. I want a partner in life. Do you know? We’re just getting started. No one could love you as much as I do. Choose this. Choose the adventure, Alice. This is the adventure. This is the misadventure. This is living.”  The section ends with this open question.

The novel’s second section, “Madness,” begins with the detention by immigration authorities of an Iraqi-American practical economist named Amar Jaafali at London’s Heathrow Airport in 2008. Amar is on his way to visit his brother, Sami, in Kurdistan, and has planned to stop in London to visit friends there for a couple of days, including a foreign war correspondent.  The Kafkaesque action of Amar’s detention is interchanged with his recollections of his childhood and early adulthood.

The style of the first section is mostly unemotional dialogue.  The second section is told from Amar’s first person highly sensitive perspective.  In Amar’s story, we get the day-to-day effects of war on his family in Iraq and the often-disconnected perspective of western journalists who tend to arrive in the Middle East with preconceived notions about the region. However, the longer they stay in the region and actually experience it, the more disproven their notions become.  “There’s an old saying about how the foreign journalist who travels to the Middle East and stays a week goes home to write a book in which he presents a pat solution to all of its problems. If he stays a month, he writes a magazine or a newspaper article filled with ‘ifs,’ ‘buts,’ and ‘on the other hands.’ If he stays a year, he writes nothing at all.”

The third section of the novel – “Ezra Blazer’s Desert Island Discs” – consists entirely of a transcript of a recording of a BBC interview with Ezra Blazer for its “Desert Island Discs” series, in which guests choose their favorite musical recordings, which are played between their responses to interview questions. In the interview Ezra reflects on his life and work, and the transcript ends with him asking the female interviewer on a date, posing the same question to her that he did to Alice in the novel’s first section: “Are you game?”

It’s rare that a book continues to pose questions and engage a reader on so many levels long after the final page is read.  I highly recommend embarking on this literary adventure.  Are you game?

Watch Bryan on WZZM Channel 13’s “My West Michigan” morning show at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, January 7.  Join The Book Nook’s monthly book club at 6:00 p.m., Wednesday, January 2 to discuss Asymmetry at the Book Nook & Java Shop in Downtown Montague with refreshments, snacks, beverages, and camaraderie; of course, everyone is welcome. The Club meets monthly all year long.  Get 20% off the Book Club’s book selection all month, too.

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“Red Notice” by Bill Browder

rednoticeRed Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man’s Fight for Justice is an enthralling memoir by Bill Browder that reads like an espionage thriller.

Bill Browder comes from a leftist family.  His grandfather, Earl Browder, runs for President on the American Communist Party ticket in 1936 and 1940.  He appears on the cover of Time Magazine in 1938 with the caption “Comrade Earl Browder.”  Forcing depression-era America to focus on the failings of mainstream capitalism, he arguably causes most political players of the time to revise their policies leftward.  Into this family comes grandson Bill Browder making the ultimate rebel move:  he embraces capitalism and gets an M.B.A. from Stanford.

After getting his feet wet with his first few investment and consulting firms, he chooses to specialize in the enigmatic and virgin area:  Eastern Europe.  His first assignment in Poland is getting paid big consulting bucks to ultimately tell the failing bus company to lay off most of the staff – it is equally disastrous and humorous.  While there, he witnesses Poland’s first-ever privatizations – the government is unloading its property and state-run businesses at a steal. The lightbulb goes off when he realizes, quicker than most investors, the demise of the Communist bloc offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get insanely rich.

In 1995, Hermitage Capital Management is born, Bill Browder moves to Moscow focusing on investments in Russia. Here begins a rollercoaster ride wildly whipsawed by the volatility of investing in the wild-wild East.  By 1997, Hermitage is the best performing fund in the world, and Bill Browder is considered a financial superman and instant expert on investing in Russia.  His meteoric rise (turning $25 million into $1 billion) takes a dive (down to $100 million) when Russian oligarchs begin diluting the value of shares owned by westerners.  Putin is elected in 2000, in part, because he vows to clean up malfeasance by the oligarchs.  At first, Browder considers him an ally, but later realizes Putin doesn’t want to clean up Russia; he just wants to redirect the bounty from the oligarchs to his KGB friends.  With continued opportunistic, creative, and stealthy investing, the Hermitage fund recovers, skyrocketing to $4.5 billion.  Browder is the largest foreign investor in the country.  And then, in 2005, while flying back to London, Browder is detained at the Moscow airport for 15 hours and expelled from Russia with no explanation.

Browder puts up a fight.  His office, those of his attorneys, as well as those of the underlying companies in his investment portfolio are raided.  His Russian attorney, Sergei Magnitsky, uncovers a fraudulent $230 million tax scheme committed by internal officers.  Those that committed the crime have him arrested, and, while in custody, he is tortured and killed.

At this point in the story, Bill Browder transforms from the mega-capitalist investor to a fervent activist seeking justice for the murder of his friend and attorney.  He brings his fight to Washington and with another roller coaster “winds-of-fate” story, achieves bipartisan support for the Magnitsky Act signed into law by Barack Obama in 2012.  That law bans 18 Russian officials responsible for Magnitsky’s death from entering the US and freezes their assets.  Putin immediately retaliates by banning Americans from adopting Russian children.  Bill Browder understands the danger he is up against.  He tells the reader that if he dies a mysterious, untimely death, know this: it was Putin.

I highly recommend this riveting memoir – a tale much richer than fiction.

Watch Bryan on WZZM Channel 13’s “My West Michigan” morning show at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 3.  Join The Book Nook’s monthly book club at 6:00 p.m., Wednesday, December 5 to discuss Red Notice at the Book Nook & Java Shop in Downtown Montague with refreshments, snacks, beverages, and camaraderie; of course, everyone is welcome. The Club meets monthly all year long.  Get 20% off the Book Club’s book selection all month, too.

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“A $500 House in Detroit” by Drew Philp

500houseOn the surface, this is a story of a young, idealistic college kid from the University of Michigan wanting to use his studies and hard work to make a difference in the town that needed the biggest difference made: Detroit.  He moved with no money, no job, and no friends to an apartment in the red-light district and on notorious murder row.  His apartment neighbors were crack dealers, prostitutes, and drug addicts.  And although he was out of his element, something about the place made him feel connected – much more so than in affluent Ann Arbor, where he was finishing his degree.  Commuting back and forth between Detroit and Ann Arbor his last year of college, Philp describes as economic jet lag – yo-yoing back and forth between extreme ends of race and economic divide only 40 miles apart.  His first job was as the white-face front to an all-black construction company.  The company shamelessly used his white voice and white face to bid the more lucrative jobs in the suburbs.

At 23, he bought a monstrous shamble of a house on auction for $500 – a big 2-story Queen Anne with a wraparound porch and a yard for a garden.  It needed a new everything: porch, roof, walls, floors, plumbing, electricity, heating, the works.  It was stripped and full of trash.  He says, “I wanted a house nobody wanted, a house that was impossible.  The city was filled with these structures.  It would be only one house out of thousands, but I wanted to prove it could be done, that this American torment could be built back into a home.  Fixing it would be a protest of sorts.”  It will take muscle, defiance, ruthlessness, and community to fix this thing.  And poetically, it will take the same ingredients to rebuild the city.

There were so many points in the story that less adventurous mortals like me were begging him to throw in the towel:  spending a Detroit winter in a creaky, drafty house with no heat; learning the foundation needed to be lifted; shoveling out 2 stories of trash piles as high as his chest; trying to sleep with gunshots outside the house; the basement flooding.  This was not an easy life.  Why are you doing this?

Philps began to realize “Detroit was just America with the volume turned all the way up, that what was about to happen would have repercussions for the rest of the Western world.  Detroit was the most interesting city on the planet, because when you scratched the surface you found only a mirror.”  The big struggles America faces: racism, economic disparity, education, drugs, crime, hopelessness, were the same in Detroit, but on steroids.  And how a powerhouse of a model city in its heyday can within a matter of decades be the open wound of the country is one of the most telling stories of American history.

What Philps learned from those eight years was that “there were still 700,000 people living in Detroit, with their own ideas about what it should become. There was a community already here, not a grotesque one that needed changing as I had been told, but a powerful and innovative one I wanted to assimilate into.”

Nowadays you hear about the hip vibe coming from Detroit – the renewal and renaissance.  Philps gives a cautionary warning about repeating errors from the past.  While 80 percent of Detroit is black, 70 percent of those leading the regeneration are white.  Developers have been sweeping in and bidding on properties against black families occupying the houses.  Philps and a friend successfully outbid a developer from ousting a neighbor.  City and state funds are funneled not to the diehard citizens of Detroit that lived through the crises but to the likes of billionaire Mike Illitch to build a new hockey arena.  Starting fifteen years ago, one-third of Detroit homes have been foreclosed, the homeowners evicted.  In 2014 over 100,000, one seventh of the city, had their water shut off.  This is the dark underbelly of the “renaissance”.

A $500 House in Detroit was selected as the 2018 One Book, One Community read for the White Lake Area.  Join us for a community book discussion at the Book Nook & Java Shop at 6 p.m. Wednesday, November 7.  A community potluck will be held at 5 p.m. at Lebanon Lutheran Church in Whitehall on November 11. Drew Philp will attend the potluck, and at 7 p.m. he will talk about and sign his book and some of the impact it has had since being published a year ago.

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